2011

Negros Forests Celebrates 25 Years

In the mid 1980s a group of Negrenses concerned about the vanishing forests of Negros decided to do something about it before it was too late and before there wasn't a single hectare of natural forest left.

Some 25 years later that small movement has grown into one of the most active and important environmental organizations in the country.

Recently, and fittingly at Nature's Village in Talisay, the Negros Forests and Ecological Foundation, Inc (NFEFI) marked it's 25th anniversary with the financial support of sponsor CEMEX.

NFEFI Marks 25 Years of Environmental Work

But more funding is needed

Visayan Bleeding Heart Pigeon
Visayan Bleeding Heart Pigeon, one of the most critically endangered animals in Negros

The Negros Forests and Ecological Foundation (NFEFI), which has worked tirelessly for 25 years to protect and conserve the environment and wildlife of Negros, is calling for more funds to continue its vital work.

"It's an uphill battle", said NFEFI president Paul Lizares. "Despite new laws and the work of our group, the environment is still getting a raw deal from many inhabitants with continued illegal logging, poaching, selling of endangered species and many other 'crimes' against nature.

"We are in danger of running out of time. If future generations are to enjoy their birthright of a beautiful environment we must all pull together and act before it's too late".

NFEFI projects are mainly managed by volunteers. Over the years these volunteers have worked to reforest hundreds of hectares especially in the all-important Upper Calimban-Imbang watershed, which provides clean drinking water to Bacolod.

NFEFI has also established one of the country's leading conservation breeding centers. Housed by the Provincial Lagoon in Bacolod City, the center is home to some 120 endangered animals and birds.

Major Mangrove Project Launched in Sipalay

Sipalay City, in partnership with the Energy Development Corporation (EDC) and Negros Forests and Ecological Foundation (NFEFI), has launched an ambitious four-year project to plant 20 hectares of mangrove forest along the city’s northern coastline.



Signing the MOA on Friday to launch the mangrove project in Sipalay. (l-r) NFEFI president Paul Lizares, EDC's Roberto Cama, Sipalay City Mayor Oscar Montilla Jr, DENR's Chief Regional Executive Director Julian Amador

The reforestation project aims to reverse the degradation and loss of mangrove forests in the area.

Some Threatened Animals and Plants in Negros

Negros Bleeding-heart Pigeon

Negros Bleeding-heart Pigeon

Scientific name: Gallicolumba keayi

Local name:Baditan

Ecological Role: Fruigivore, seed dispersal

Conservation status: Critically endangered

 

 

Visayan Writhed Hornbill

Visayan Writhed Hornbill

Scientific name: Aceros Waldeni

Local name: Kalaw

Ecological Role:

Fruigivore, insectivore, seed dispersal-agent, help control insect

Conservation status: Critically endangered

 

Golden-crowned Flying Fox

Golden-crowned Flying Fox

Scientific name:Acerodon jubatus

Ecological Role:Fruigivore, seed dispersal

Conservation status: Endangered. Their number are rapidly declining due to the loss of their forest and cave habitats where they are severely hunted for food.

 

 

Negros Bared-backed Fruit Bat

Negros Bared-backed Fruit Bat

 

Scientific name:Dobsonia chapmani

Ecological Role: Fruigivore, seed dispersal-pollinator

Conservation status: Critically endangered. They are recorded to be extinct in 1970’s due to destruction of forest habitats, disturbance on their cave habitats by guano miners, and hunting.

 

Visayan Tarictic Hornbill

Visayan Tarictic Hornbill

Scientific name:Penelopidas Panini

Local name: Tularik

Ecological Role: Fruigivore, insectivore, seed dispersal-agent, help control insects

Conservation status: Endangered.

 

Visayan Spotted Dear

Visayan Spotted Dear

Scientific name:Rusa alfredi

Local name: Usa

Ecological Role: Herbivore/Fruigivore, seed dispersal-agent

Conservation status: Critically endangered.

Palm Civet

Palm Civet

Scientific name: Paradoxurus hermaphrodites

Local name: “Milo”, “Musang” or “Alamid”

Ecological Role: They eat fruits, small birds and insects, spread the fruit of the trees like coffee and others.

Conservation status:

 

Malay Civet

Malay Civet

Scientific name: Viverra tangalunga

Local name: “Singgarong” or “Alamid”

Ecological Role: They eat fruits, small birds and insects, spread the seed of trees like coffee and others.

Conservation status:

 

 

 

 

Some Threatened Plants in Negros

Dao

Scientific name:

Dracontomelon dao

 

Description:

A large tree reaching a height of 40 meters and a diameter of 10 centimeters. The bark is grayish, smooth and flaky

Ecological Role:

Habitat stabilization and good water reservoir.

Economic Uses:

Fruits and young leaves are edible, wood is used for sliced veneers, furniture, cabinets, tables and other uses.

Conservation status:

Endangered. Depleted due to logging, kaingin and conversion of forests in other uses. Very few mother trees found in the forest of Negros.

 

Tangili

Scientific name:

Agathis Philipinenses

 

Description:

A large tree up to 50 meters high and a diameter of 200 centimeters. The bark is light red.

Ecological Role:

Habitat stabilization and good water reservoir.

Economic Uses:

Wood is used for cabinet-making, plywood and construction materials.

Conservation status:

Endangered. Depleted due to logging, kaingin making.uses. Very few mother trees found in the forest of Negros.

 

Red Lauan

Scientific name:

Shorea negrosensis

 

Description:

A tall tree up to 50 meters high and 2 meters in diameter. The bark is thick, dark brown with reddish tinge. A dipterocarp species that once dominated in Negros Island.

Ecological Role:

Habitat stabilization and good water reservoir.

Economic Uses:

Wood is commonly used for furniture and cabinet works, veneer, hardboard, plywood, boat planking and construction materials.

Conservation status:

Endangered. Depleted due to logging, kaingin making.uses. Very few mother trees found in the forest of Negros.

 

The Diminishing Natural Treasure

The Philippines

PhilippinesThe Philippines is one of 17 megadiverse countries, with more than 52,117 described species. Over 57% of the major faunal and floral groups occur nowhere else in the world (Oliver & Heaney, 1996) and per hectare may harbor more biological diversity than any other country in the world. (Philippine Biodiversity Conservation Priorities, 2002). In the early 1500s, the Philippines had native forests covering 27 million hectares or 90% of the archipelago’s total area. At the beginning of 1900s the forest cover was reduced to 21 million hectares and decreased to 6.1 million hectares in 1999, representing a loss of 15 million hectares in less than one century (Lasco et al, 2001). Currently, there are approximately 10,773,000 hectares of forests in the Philippines but estimates suggest that 2,031,000 hectraes have been lost in the last 15 years (FAO, 2005). The average annual rate deforestation is 1.4% loss per year between 2000 and 2005.

Biological diversity of the different forest types in the Philippines is significantly high. However, deforestation rates in the Philippines are still one of the highest in the tropics considered as diversity hotspot (Myers et al, 2000). As such, the Philippine forest species and habitats are one of the most endangered in the world and face imminent threat of destruction. This biodiversity is continually under the threat through the habitat destruction, alteration and fragmentation.

Running for Change

 May 1, 2011

Some 350 runners from Negros and Panay competed in Saturday's 'I Run For Change' fun run featuring distances of three, five and 10km plus a special one kilometer event for children.


Start of the 10k run

The run, to raise funds for two key environmental groups in Negros, was the climax to a month of activities in support of Earth Month.

Changing the World

 April 24, 2011

“I” for Change has been the catchy theme for a host of activities in April to celebrate Earth Month. It signifies that one act to help the environment and be environmentally aware can make a difference.

Organized by the Philippine Reef & Rainforest Conservation Foundation (PRRCF) Earth Month celebrations, which started one April 1 with a fund- raiser art exhibit at the Orange Gallery, will reach a climax on Saturday, April 30 with a fun run and a concert.


Batfish at the Danjugan Island marine reserve and sanctuaries

The Earth Month 'I RUN for FUN' run kicks off at 5am on Saturday at the newly-opened Art District behind Lopue's Mandalagan. It will feature three, five and 10 kilometer runs plus a special one kilometer event for children.